OBSERVATION: There is no such thing as business ethics; there’s just ethics.

by Michael Josephson on November 16, 2011

in Odds & Ends, Quotes, Observations

There are no exemptions from basic rules of honesty, respect, caring, and fairness just because money or careers are involved. Our private lives, our relationships, and the way we make a living are governed by the same moral principles. Don’t get caught up in rationalizations and pressures. In every setting we have the opportunity and obligation to be a good person. The good news is good ethics is good business. See today’s commentary about Firms of Endearment at whatwillmatter.com.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Randy Bosch November 16, 2011 at 9:03 am

A basic truth that, sadly, needs continual “in broad daylight” reinforcement for everyone. Those who apply different sets of “ethics” to different sectors of their or others lives (“situational ethics”) at the core do not have a moral foundation worthy of claiming as one.

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Maxwell Pinto November 16, 2011 at 2:27 pm

Ethics is concerned with “doing the right thing” in terms of morals, fairness, respect, caring, sharing, no false promises, no lying, cheating, stealing, or unreasonable demands on employees and others, etc. In addition, business ethics calls for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and addressing social problems such as poverty, crime, environmental protection, equal rights, public health and improving education. We need a practical approach rather than a philosophical one, with “leadership by example.”

Business decisions often concern complicated situations which are neither totally ethical nor totally unethical. Therefore, it is often difficult to “do the right thing,” contrary to what many case studies will have you believe!

In a proposed sale, is it the seller’s duty to disclose all material facts regarding the product/ service in question or is it the buyer’s responsibility to find out the pros and cons of what he or she is getting into? Should the seller answer each question exactly as it was asked, and ignore some pertinent information? Or should he or she merely address the spirit of the question? Is the buyer responsible for due diligence?

For free abridged books on leadership, ethics, teamwork, women in the workforce, sexual harassment and bullying, trade unions, etc. send an e-mail request to maxpin1@hotmail.com.

Maxwell Pinto, Business Consultant and Author.
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/MaxPinto
http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/leadership-and-ethics-major-ingredients-of-the-business-recipe/18646122

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